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  • Nissan Leaf EVs to join NYC taxis, won’t make hailing a cab in Manhattan any easier
    We’ve come a long way since Crown Vics crowded the streets of the Big Apple, opting instead for a fleet of hybrid taxis — but today the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission is taking its green approach one step further with the introduction of six electric Nissan Leaf cabs. Starting next spring, the electric cars will join the procession of mustard-colored whips as part of the Electric Taxi Pilot Program. The new additions are part of Bloomberg’s plans for an all electric cab system by 2012. It’s unsure yet whether the five-door electrics will have a distance or duty limitation and exactly what type of charging stations will be used. Curious cabbies can check out the source to find out how to sign up. Now, if we could only flag one down…

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    Nissan Leaf EVs to join NYC taxis, won’t make hailing a cab in Manhattan any easier originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • Screen Grabs: Palm Pre-iPhone hybrid appears on Grimm, doesn’t look half bad
    Screen Grabs chronicles the uses (and misuses) of real-world gadgets in today’s movies and TV. Send in your sightings (with screen grab!) to screengrabs at engadget dot com.

    Anyone who caught the series premiere of Grimm, NBC’s new fairy-tale-and-crime-procedural would have seen another sort of unearthly fusion: a Palm Pre device ringing like an iPhone. The phone then switches to the typical webOS interface we’ve long admired, picking up reception on AT&T along the way. We’re torn over whether they’re using a Pre 2 or another Palm family member, though the screen looks too dinky for it to be the mythical Pre 3. But in a world of monster hunters and big bad wolves, we guess anything’s possible.

    [Thanks, Ben]

    Screen Grabs: Palm Pre-iPhone hybrid appears on Grimm, doesn’t look half bad originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • Engadget Primed: SSDs and you
    Primed goes in-depth on the technobabble you hear on Engadget every day — we dig deep into each topic’s history and how it benefits our lives. Looking to suggest a piece of technology for us to break down? Drop us a line at primed *at* engadget *dawt* com.

    If you’re a storage aficionado — and who here isn’t? — you’ve probably heard a lot about SSDs, those friendly solid-state disks promising dramatically improved performance over their magnetically inclined brethren. No doubt you’ve heard about the advantages, thanks to NAND storage that makes them silent, shock resistant, energy efficient and lightning quick. Yet you’ve also heard the horror stories: drive slowdowns, controller failures and manufacturer recalls. And adding to all those anxiety-producing headlines, there’s the price premium. While most magnetic drives average around a nickel or dime per gigabyte, even consumer-grade SSDs still run $1-2 per gigabyte, often for drastically smaller-capacity drives.

    Three years ago, Intel launched its X25-M and X18-M: the “M” stood for “mainstream,” and the pair of drives were designed to reintroduce solid-state storage to a cost-conscious consumer market. (Perhaps more importantly, they were also meant to solidify Intel’s standing in the nascent SSD realm, up to that point a chaotic, Wild West-style domain. But we’ll get to that.) For most users magnetic drives still remain king, with solid states appealing primarily to a niche of enterprise IT professionals and modding enthusiasts. How did that happen — and should it be different? After the break we’ll look at how and why SSDs haven’t (yet) conquered the storage world, and examine whether they’re poised to do just that.

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    Engadget Primed: SSDs and you originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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